Evicting the Invaders

Before

Before: Part of approximately 5,000 square feet of invasive plants on the Gerry Connolly Cross County Trail.

This picture looks like simple greenery. You may not even notice these plants as you walk your dog or jog along the trail. But untouched, these simple plants quickly become invaders. They spread rapidly and cause ecological or economic harm by degrading our natural ecosystem. They choke out the native plants in their path.

The Fairfax County Park Authority’s Invasive Management Area (IMA) Program fights these invasive plants in an effort to prevent them from taking over our parkland. The Park Authority can’t do it alone! Many hands are needed to clear a project site. IMA often partners with organizations like businesses, school groups, Scouts BSA and Girl Scouts to battle these invasive plants.

Scout Invasive Project Along Difficult Run 2Here’s one example. Every Saturday and Sunday in October 2019, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Fairfax County Public School students, college students and neighborhood homeowners gathered to pull invasive plants, primarily pachysandra, from a section of the Gerry Connolly Cross County Trail off Miller Heights Road in Oakton. I am a Scout in BSA Troop 987, and I led the project with support from Hornaday Badge Advisor Sara Holtz and with sponsorship from the Invasive Management Area program.

Scout Invasive Project Along Difficult Run 1During 210 volunteer hours, 99 volunteers removed 85 bags of invasive plants from the parkland. The goal was to replace the pachysandra with native plants and trees. Volunteers planted white wood aster, hairy bush clover, American alumroot, trailing bush clover, dwarf cinquefoil, pussytoes, arrowleaf violet, common wood rush, Pennsylvania sedge, bluestem, goldenrod, arrowwood viburnum, witch hazel, hazelnut trees, ironwood trees, and redbud trees.

After

After: Invasive plants replaced with 110 native plants and trees.

I created the plan for this project in order to earn the BSA Hornaday Badge, an award created by conservationist Dr. William T. Hornaday. It is a prestigious award that requires a scout to lead a conservation project, complete several merit badges, and meet rank requirements. By successfully completing this project, I am one step closer to earning the Boy Scout Hornaday Badge, and the Gerry Connolly Cross County Trail is a step closer to being free of invasive plants.

Author Eli Edwards is a Scouts BSA Hornaday Badge candidate in BSA Troop 987.

If you’d like to volunteer on future projects, visit https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/invasive-management-area.

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About Fairfax County Park Authority

About Fairfax County Park Authority HISTORY: On December 6, 1950, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors created the Fairfax County Park Authority. The Park Authority was authorized to make decisions concerning land acquisition, park development and operations in Fairfax County, Virginia. To date, 13 park bond referenda have been approved between 1959 and 2016. Today, the Park Authority has 427 parks on more than 23,000 acres of land. We offer 325 miles of trails, our most popular amenity. FACILITIES: The Park system is the primary public mechanism in Fairfax County for the preservation of environmentally sensitive land and resources, areas of historic significance and the provision of recreational facilities and services including: • Nine indoor RECenters with swimming pools, fitness rooms, gyms and class spaces. Cub Run features an indoor water park and on-site naturalist • Eight golf courses from par-3 to championship level, four driving ranges including the new state-of-the-art heated, covered range at Burke Lake Golf Center • Five nature and visitor centers. Also nine Off-Leash Dog Activity areas • Three lakefront parks including Lake Fairfax, Lake Accotink and Burke Lake, with campgrounds at Burke Lake and Lake Fairfax. The Water Mine Family Swimmin’ Hole at Lake Fairfax, Our Special Harbor Sprayground at Lee as well as an indoor water park at Cub Run RECenter • Clemyjontri Park, a fully accessible playground in Great Falls featuring two acres of family friendly fun and a carousel, as well as Chessie’s Big Backyard and a carousel at the Family Recreation Area at Lee District Park • An ice skating rink at Mount Vernon RECenter and the Skate Park in Wakefield Park adjacent to Audrey Moore RECenter • Kidwell Farm, a working farm of the 1930s-era at Frying Pan Farm Park in Herndon, now with historic carousel • Eight distinctive historic properties available for rent • A working grist mill at Colvin Run in Great Falls and a restored 18th century home at Sully Historic Site in Chantilly • A horticulture center at Green Spring Gardens in Annandale • Natural and cultural resources protected by the Natural Resource Management Plan and Cultural Resource Plans, plus an Invasive Management Area program that targets alien plants and utilizes volunteers in restoring native vegetation throughout our community • Picnic shelters, tennis courts, miniature golf courses, disc golf courses, off-leash dog parks, amphitheaters, a marina, kayaking/canoeing center • Provides 263 athletic fields, including 39 synthetic turf fields, and manages athletic field maintenance services at 417 school athletic fields. PARK AUTHORITY BOARD: A 12-member citizen board, appointed by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, sets policies and priorities for the Fairfax County Park Authority. Visit https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/news2/social-hub/ for Fairfax County Government's Comment Policy.

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