Trail Planner Liz Cronauer Discusses Park Authority Trail Development

Trail Program Manager Liz Cronauer speaks at the 2010 opening of the Clarks Branch Crossing bridge in Riverbend Park.

Liz Cronauer, trail program manager for the Fairfax County Park Authority, recently updated members of Fairfax Trails and Streams (FTAS) on the agency’s Trail Development Strategy. Cronauer visits the group at least once a year to discuss completed trail projects and future connections. FTAS’s primary focus is on trails in Great Falls and McLean, but they’re also interested in seeing the completion of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail (PHNST) in southern Fairfax County, which, according to Cronauer, could be completed within the next decade. “This is a good crowd of people to talk to. They’re all pro trails, and members have lots of ideas,” she said.

Trails are consistently ranked as the most popular park amenity by Fairfax County residents. According to Cronauer, the reason trails are liked so much is because trails appeal to such a wide range of people. “You can use them for walking, cycling, and bird watching. All ages use trails, and they’re free,” she said. “There is a big demand for passive recreation,” she continued. (Although most recreational pursuits on trails are considered active, trails are officially classified as passive recreation. Organized facilities such as ball fields and swimming pools are classified as active recreation areas.)

Flooding from remnants of Tropical Storm Lee ravaged trails throughout the county last September.

In September 2011, the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee ravaged Fairfax County, and some areas within the Park Authority’s stream valley trail network were washed away. “Significant damage remains,” said Cronauer. She said the damage was so extensive in some places that the short term goal of the Park Operations Division was to simply make the trails functional again rather than restore them to their original condition.  In certain places the damage was severe.  It will take a little longer to restore functionality in those areas.  “Long Branch Stream Valley was hit hard, specifically the bridge.  A bridge needs to be replaced and plans are now in place to move that project forward in the next 12 to 18 months. Part of the trail along Difficult Run has also been severely damaged. Parks Ops has done a tremendous amount of work and replaced tons of stone,” Cronauer said. Repairs to trails throughout the county continue.

The Cross County Trail connects the Potomac River in the north to the Occoquan River in the south.

Although the Park Authority is always trying to add new trails, Cronauer said it’s important to “improve areas that we already have.” She’s always looking for ways to forge new connections to the Cross County Trail (CCT), the 41.5-mile trail which links Great Falls Park in the north to Occoquan Regional Park in the south. In 2010, the Park Authority completed the Barbara Lane connector trail, which made it easier for people in the eastern Mantua neighborhood to access the CCT.  Cronauer said future trail connections include “fixing the footpath within Mount Vernon District Park along Fort Hunt Road.” Once this trail has been improved, people will be able to safely walk and bicycle to Mount Vernon RECenter. There are also plans to improve the South Run Stream Valley trail by paving the section that traces the north side of Lake Mercer and connecting it to South Run RECenter. “Any time you can create ways for people to bicycle to a RECenter is just great,” Cronauer said.

The Lake Fairfax trail network continues to grow.

The 2012 Park Bond, still to be authorized and then potentially approved by voters, allocates additional funds for trail improvements. The Park Authority Board will decide where to spend the money if Fairfax County citizens pass the bond.  Cronauer hopes to see funding for some particular trail projects noting, “Pohick Stream Valley is one of the last major stream valley trail areas that hasn’t been completed. That would be a high priority for me because we could make a really good connection to the Cross County Trail. Additionally, we would like to finish the trail network at Lake Fairfax Park.”

The Park Authority is regularly approached by volunteers with an interest in trail building and maintenance. Cronauer said “The best way for them to be involved is through a trails group. The Park Authority coordinates with trails groups such as M.O.R.E. (Mid-Atlantic Off-Road Enthusiasts) and FTAS, and they manage volunteers and coordinate with area managers to identify projects. Together they get a lot of work done.”

Cronauer was hired as the trails program manager in October 2005, when the Park Authority created the position. She leads a small team of two project managers.  

As a resident of Prince William County, Cronauer spends a lot of time in majestic Prince William Forest near Quantico, but she has her favorite trails in Fairfax County, too. “I really love the section of the CCT in the Pohick Stream Valley and all the Riverbend Park trails. I also like the single track trails we built in Laurel Hill,” she said.

Written by Matthew Kaiser, deputy public information officer

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About Fairfax County Park Authority

HISTORY: On December 6, 1950, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors created the Fairfax County Park Authority. The Park Authority was authorized to make decisions concerning land acquisition, park development and operations in Fairfax County, Virginia. To date, 11 park bond referenda have been approved between 1959 and 2008. Another Park Bond Referendum will be held in November 2012. Today, the Park Authority has 420 parks on approximately 23,168 acres of land. We offer 371 miles of trails, our most popular amenity. FACILITIES: The Park System is the primary public mechanism in Fairfax County for the preservation of environmentally sensitive land and resources, areas of historic significance and the provision of recreational facilities and services including: o Nine indoor RECenters with swimming pools, fitness rooms, gyms and class spaces. Cub Run features an indoor water park and on-site naturalist. o Eight golf courses including Laurel Hill, our newest, upscale course and clubhouse located in Southern Fairfax County o Five nature and visitor centers. Also seven Off-Leash Dog Activity areas o Several lakes including Lake Fairfax, Lake Accotink and Burke Lake, with campgrounds at Burke Lake and Lake Fairfax o The Water Mine Family Swimmin’ Hole at Lake Fairfax, Our Special Harbor Sprayground at Lee as well as an indoor water park at Cub Run RECenter o Clemyjontri Park, a fully accessible playground in Great Falls featuring two acres of family friendly fun and a carousel o An ice skating rink at Mount Vernon RECenter and the Skate Park in Wakefield Park adjacent to Audrey Moore RECenter o Kidwell Farm, a working farm of the 1930s era at Frying Pan Farm Park in Herndon, now with historic carousel o Eight distinctive historic properties available for rent o A working grist mill at Colvin Run in Great Falls and a restored 18th century home at Sully Historic Site in Chantilly o A horticulture center at Green Spring Gardens in Annandale o Natural and cultural resources protected by the Natural Resource Management Plan and Cultural Resource Plans, plus an Invasive Management Area program that targets alien plants and utilizes volunteers in restoring native vegetation throughout our community o Picnic shelters, tennis courts, miniature golf courses, disc golf courses, off-leash dog parks, amphitheaters, a marina, kayaking/canoeing center o Provides 274 athletic fields, including 30 synthetic turf fields, and manages athletic field maintenance services at 500 school athletic fields PARK AUTHORITY BOARD: • A 12-member citizen board, appointed by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, sets policies and priorities for the Fairfax County Park Authority. Visit http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/news2/social-hub/ for Fairfax County Government's Comment Policy.

2 thoughts on “Trail Planner Liz Cronauer Discusses Park Authority Trail Development

  1. Jeff

    The part of Pohick Stream Valley connecting the Burke VRE to Coffer Woods is almost done. I assume (hope) completing it means connecting Burke Lake Road to the FFX Parkway through Burke Station Park, Hidden Pond, and West Springfield Village Park?? That would be fantastic!

    Reply
  2. Liz Cronauer

    The Park Authority plans to start design of the next section of the Pohick Stream Valley trail this spring with the help of a grant from the Federal Highways Transportation Enhancement Act (TEA). This section will extend the trail from Burke Lake Road to an existing trail connecting to Hatchers Ct. The project will also include a bridge over Pohick and an additional trail that connects to Burke Road near Liberty Bell Ct. Construction is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2014. That is the extent of the funding at present, but we certainly would like to eventually take a trail all the way down to the Fairfax County Parkway.

    Reply

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