Tag Archives: South Run RECenter

Marge Says

Seniors get exercise and catch up with friends during a water aerobics for arthritis at South Run RECenter.

Seniors exercise and catch up with friends during a water aerobics for arthritis class at South Run RECenter.

Oh, we all have our aches and pains, our pacemakers, joint replacements and health problems but they seem less significant when we are there together. Besides, none of us is particularly stunning in a bathing suit at this point in our lives anyway.

Marge says to me, “Why don’t you write a story about us, George? We’re a unique group.” Indeed, I guess we are. We are the ten o’clock water aerobics arthritis class at South Run Park. Of course, far from all of us are in that class because we suffer with arthritis. I mean, when you are a senior, who wants to rush to get up and get to a class at 8 or 9 in the morning? Coffee and the newspaper are much more fun until you can get your body going, and we all agree that it takes longer and longer for that to happen. Oh, we all have our aches and pains, our pacemakers, joint replacements and health problems but they seem less significant when we are there together. Besides, none of us is particularly stunning in a bathing suit at this point in our lives anyway.

The first task of the day is counting the men. Are there four or five of us today? Maybe six. Where is Joe? Haven’t seen Dave since last week. We have a new guy. One day we are going to outnumber the women. Bill, the lead counter, is 89. If only I could live to 89, I should do half as well as he. Bill is an amazing gent. He travels all over the United States visiting family, makes several annual trips to Florida on the auto train and is in a perpetually positive and humorous state of mind.

There are scores of interesting folks, Anna, who talks frequently of her sick cat, and though in her 80s leaves class and invites all of us to meet her and friends at McDonalds for lunch every day, who says McDonalds appeals only to young folks? Sam, who says he is trying to overcome 45 years of inactivity, May, always with tales of the wild kindergarten grandchild and those teachers who reminisce about their experiences in the classroom. Politics is outlawed and that is good for all of us.

Don’t get the idea that water aerobics is not serious business, it is. However, first we need to find out what Pete has planted in his garden, how tall the corn is, if there are any signs of tomatoes yet. How Shirley’s and Fred’s trip across the Atlantic on the Queen Mary went. Who is reading what book and will they share it when they finished and a dozen or so other equally important things.

In a fifty-five minute class surely there is time for a little bit of chatter before, Carolyn, the instructor says, “If all you are going to do is talk, then move to the back corner.” All gets quickly quiet for a few moments and we attempt to follow the instructions all the while amazed at Carolyn’s energy level and how easily she can move her body in ways that most of us couldn’t even twenty years ago. She is patient with us as she yells out, “Watch your posture, stand up tall, you’re leaning.” Or our favorite, “faster, faster.” I am always certain that I am the only one that is leaning forward. But I know I am not the one going slow.

After about twenty-five minutes we grab our noodles and ride them like we did our pretend ponies when we were little kids. What fun! Who can paddle without their legs touching the bottom of the pool, who touches and who cheats doing a combination of both. On occasion, we take the noodle in one hand and swing it wildly in the air making certain that as we do it splashes the water periodically so someone will complain they are getting their hair wet. Of course we stretch the noodle in every possible uncomfortable position.

In the end, Carolyn wishes us well and tells us that we are finished for the day. Whew! We are tired but it is time for our reward. Out of the pool, we grab towels and rush to the hot tub to finish our conversations, relax, check on everyone’s weekend, children, and grandchildren and just soak in the warm water. It seems that we have plenty to say. We bid our farewells and then it is off to our own activities until Monday, Wednesday or Friday, whichever one is next.

Thinking about us, I am reminded of the quote from Margery Williams “Velveteen Rabbit”: “When someone really loves you, then you become real. Generally by the time you are real most of your hair has been loved off, your eyes droop and you get loose in the joints. But once you are real it lasts forever.” A collection of grandmas and grandpas, we are about as real as it gets and in spite of our lack of hair and loose joints, we can always count on having a really good time.

Written by George Towery

Trail Planner Liz Cronauer Discusses Park Authority Trail Development

Trail Program Manager Liz Cronauer speaks at the 2010 opening of the Clarks Branch Crossing bridge in Riverbend Park.

Liz Cronauer, trail program manager for the Fairfax County Park Authority, recently updated members of Fairfax Trails and Streams (FTAS) on the agency’s Trail Development Strategy. Cronauer visits the group at least once a year to discuss completed trail projects and future connections. FTAS’s primary focus is on trails in Great Falls and McLean, but they’re also interested in seeing the completion of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail (PHNST) in southern Fairfax County, which, according to Cronauer, could be completed within the next decade. “This is a good crowd of people to talk to. They’re all pro trails, and members have lots of ideas,” she said.

Trails are consistently ranked as the most popular park amenity by Fairfax County residents. According to Cronauer, the reason trails are liked so much is because trails appeal to such a wide range of people. “You can use them for walking, cycling, and bird watching. All ages use trails, and they’re free,” she said. “There is a big demand for passive recreation,” she continued. (Although most recreational pursuits on trails are considered active, trails are officially classified as passive recreation. Organized facilities such as ball fields and swimming pools are classified as active recreation areas.)

Flooding from remnants of Tropical Storm Lee ravaged trails throughout the county last September.

In September 2011, the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee ravaged Fairfax County, and some areas within the Park Authority’s stream valley trail network were washed away. “Significant damage remains,” said Cronauer. She said the damage was so extensive in some places that the short term goal of the Park Operations Division was to simply make the trails functional again rather than restore them to their original condition.  In certain places the damage was severe.  It will take a little longer to restore functionality in those areas.  “Long Branch Stream Valley was hit hard, specifically the bridge.  A bridge needs to be replaced and plans are now in place to move that project forward in the next 12 to 18 months. Part of the trail along Difficult Run has also been severely damaged. Parks Ops has done a tremendous amount of work and replaced tons of stone,” Cronauer said. Repairs to trails throughout the county continue.

The Cross County Trail connects the Potomac River in the north to the Occoquan River in the south.

Although the Park Authority is always trying to add new trails, Cronauer said it’s important to “improve areas that we already have.” She’s always looking for ways to forge new connections to the Cross County Trail (CCT), the 41.5-mile trail which links Great Falls Park in the north to Occoquan Regional Park in the south. In 2010, the Park Authority completed the Barbara Lane connector trail, which made it easier for people in the eastern Mantua neighborhood to access the CCT.  Cronauer said future trail connections include “fixing the footpath within Mount Vernon District Park along Fort Hunt Road.” Once this trail has been improved, people will be able to safely walk and bicycle to Mount Vernon RECenter. There are also plans to improve the South Run Stream Valley trail by paving the section that traces the north side of Lake Mercer and connecting it to South Run RECenter. “Any time you can create ways for people to bicycle to a RECenter is just great,” Cronauer said.

The Lake Fairfax trail network continues to grow.

The 2012 Park Bond, still to be authorized and then potentially approved by voters, allocates additional funds for trail improvements. The Park Authority Board will decide where to spend the money if Fairfax County citizens pass the bond.  Cronauer hopes to see funding for some particular trail projects noting, “Pohick Stream Valley is one of the last major stream valley trail areas that hasn’t been completed. That would be a high priority for me because we could make a really good connection to the Cross County Trail. Additionally, we would like to finish the trail network at Lake Fairfax Park.”

The Park Authority is regularly approached by volunteers with an interest in trail building and maintenance. Cronauer said “The best way for them to be involved is through a trails group. The Park Authority coordinates with trails groups such as M.O.R.E. (Mid-Atlantic Off-Road Enthusiasts) and FTAS, and they manage volunteers and coordinate with area managers to identify projects. Together they get a lot of work done.”

Cronauer was hired as the trails program manager in October 2005, when the Park Authority created the position. She leads a small team of two project managers.  

As a resident of Prince William County, Cronauer spends a lot of time in majestic Prince William Forest near Quantico, but she has her favorite trails in Fairfax County, too. “I really love the section of the CCT in the Pohick Stream Valley and all the Riverbend Park trails. I also like the single track trails we built in Laurel Hill,” she said.

Written by Matthew Kaiser, deputy public information officer