Tag Archives: Herndon

Wow Your Toddler With A Trip To The Farm

If you are looking for something to do with your toddler that doesn’t involve a long drive, is free (or inexpensive—ok cheap!) and big on a wow factor for the little ones, Frying Pan Farm Park is a winner for families.

As a working parent and a member of the Park Authority Board I know that free time with your little ones is precious.  Like most families, my husband and I try to make the most of our weekends with our two-year-old son.  We have made Frying Pan a once a month “go-to” destination for our family since our little guy was just a few months old.

While the Park Authority has many outstanding facilities throughout Fairfax County, I think Frying Pan is one of the top destinations for families with young children.  In my opinion, a visit to Frying Pan is perfect for a toddler’s schedule (as a new mom I quickly learned that the daytime window to get out is limited to the time they wake up in the morning until lunchtime which is generally followed by a nap).  As such, the morning hours are perfect for a visit to the farm because the animals are very active.  You on the other hand may need your cup of coffee to stay awake!

I’ve found that springtime at Frying Pan is very special and the farm is full of surprises to delight little ones.  New baby animals are born nearly every month with February through May having the most deliveries.  On a recent visit we were able to see and photograph lambs, piglets and a calf.  Seeing these animals up close never fails to delight and interest our little boy.  Not only does he get to see these very social animals up close, but he hears the sounds they make.  Children learn more about the sights and (yes, smells) of the farm each time they visit.  Since the animals are cared for and handled by our amazing staff and dedicated “Friends of Frying Pan Farm Park” volunteers regularly, the animals are gentle and friendly to all.  Simply put, getting close to the animals brings the farm to life for the youngsters who visit.

This working farm is home to cows, sheep, pigs, rabbits, goats, a horse, ducks, turkeys and even peacocks!  Your little farmer-in-training can even test out the miniature stationary tractors.  The park is a year-round destination.  During warmer months you can enjoy wagon rides and an old-fashioned carousel.  When it’s really cold outside you can drop-in at the visitor center to learn about the history of the farm.  You even have the chance for a lesson in milking a cow at 4 p.m.  When it’s warm, little ones can watch the farmer milk a real cow in the barn.

If your little farmer is especially energetic after viewing the animals, take him or her to the playground down by the Country Store and carousel.  There are two spaces for play, one for toddlers and another for older children.  There are also benches for grownups to sit back and relax.

We enjoy our frequent visits to Frying Pan.  It has become a special part of our lives and in the life of our son.  I hope that you will make it a special part of your life as well!

Here are some of my Mommy DO’s and DON’Ts for visiting Frying Pan with your toddler or little one:

  • DON’T stress about parking.  There’s plenty of parking that’s close to the action (unless there’s a big special event).  No need to stress about long walks and you don’t have to haul a diaper bag along because the car is never far away.
  • DO bring rain boots for lots of puddle splashing (especially after rain or snow).  Puddles are half the fun!
  • DO bring an extra jacket (sometimes it gets windy on the farm and the temperatures can feel cooler).
  • DO bring a change of clothes.  There are lots of opportunities for kids to get dirty!
  • DO take a picture of your little one on the mini tractors!
  • DO take photos of the animals.  These are a great teaching tool for your kids when you get home.
  • DO bring a snack (there are lots of picnic tables and places to sit, have a snack, and talk about the animals with your children).
  • DO bring hand-sanitizer (as if you don’t have 12 bottles stashed in your bag already!)  It’s always good for cleaning up afterward.  If you forget, there are hand-washing stations throughout the park.
  • DO try the carousel or the wagon rides when they are operating.  They are LOADS of fun!
  • DO visit the country store.  After seeing the chickens you can swing by and pick up some farm fresh eggs and make a tasty omelet for dinner or breakfast the next day!

For more information about Frying Pan Farm Park in Herndon, visit their website.

By: Kala Quintana, Fairfax County Park Authority Board Member, At-large

Frying Pan Celebrates 15 Years of Acoustic Jams

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Back in 1998, after a tree fell onto her Kidwell farmhouse office, Frying Pan Farm Park Historian Yvonne Johnson (now park supervisor) was working in a temporary office in a construction trailer. One day Debbie Billodeaux, a woman with a Louisiana accent and a little dog named Missy, knocked on the trailer door with an idea to allow musicians to gather and play on the front porch of the new Country Store. Johnson loved the Acoustic Jam idea and thought the sessions might draw a handful of people; however, in less than a year, 20 to 40 people were showing up to play at each jam.

Since then, visitors have enjoyed Acoustic Jams every month, as friends come together in a warm, friendly setting to play harmonies on string instruments such as guitars, banjos, mandolins, dobros, fiddles and bass. According to Johnson, a couple hundred visitors might see the musicians play on a nice day. “It was so gratifying to see the response from the visitors,” Johnson said.

Billodeaux’s dream of having a place for musicians to play and introduce music to new audiences is still going strong. The park celebrated its first “Jam-iversary” earlier this month, marking the fifteenth anniversary of the jam with cake, speeches, camaraderie, and, of course, music. Looking back, Johnson said, “Debbie came up with a great idea that improves visitors’ experiences and doesn’t cost the park anything. Over the years, the jams have touched the lives of thousands of people.”

Here is the history of the Acoustic Jam, in Debbie Billodeaux’s own words.

“The Acoustic Jam started out as a once-a-month jam on the third Sunday of each month. I was inspired to start the jam when I saw the Country Store being opened up at the park in the spring/summer of that year. I thought this would be a perfect place to jam and, I must say, very convenient for me as I live close by.  I liked jams because I could play with others, learn new songs, and the flexibility of a jam worked well with my busy schedule. At the time I was going to the CABOMA jam (Capitol Area Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Association) in Arlington. Yvonne and I talked about how a jam would work and also be reflective of how people historically enjoyed music in a rural farming community. We intentionally set the Frying Pan jam up on the third Sunday so it would not interfere with the CABOMA jam in Arlington (second and fourth Sundays).

“The first jam was attended by less than 10 people, but it grew steadily.  It was usually bigger in the summer when people can be outside.  The early jams were at the Country Store, which is near the playground, and it has always been interesting to see how kids react to live music and seeing a variety of instruments close-up. In the early years, my guitar teacher at Chantilly Music, Bill Suter, would often suggest that his students get out and play with other people. He would tell them about the jam and a dozen or more people came from his referral. I often send out an email reminder to those at the jam reminding them of the jam date and also telling them about other events and jams in the area.  Jim Norman is a local resident and dobro and bass player who attends the jam, and he pushed for us to increase it to twice a month. In March 2002 we began holding jams twice a month.

“The park staff typically will ask if there are a couple of people that can play music at the Farm Harvest Day or an event for the Friends group, and so we typically do that once or twice a year. Several years the jam has been the closing act on the performance stage at the 4-H Fair. Sometimes a picture of those performances showed up in a newspaper. The Frying Pan Jam was featured once as the cover story on the Herndon Connection. Through the years we have had a couple of people that show up to listen on a regular basis.  Margaret and Ben Peck are in that group and I have a good picture of them sitting on the porch one sunny afternoon. There was another older lady who came regularly often requesting certain songs.  She grew up in West Virginia and had heard many early country legends sing as a child.  She was a music fan and she would have her husband drive her over. When he was too old to drive, they would have friends bring them. I do not know her name, but I took a picture of her and a friend and gave her a copy.

“We have had a couple of professional musicians stop by. It is a real treat for us.  We have quite a few people that are in now or have been in regional bands. We have had a number of people that have met others at the jam and then formed small bands. We also have a lot of beginners so there is usually a big mix of experience at the jam.”

Acoustic Jams are held semi-monthly at Frying Pan Farm Park on the first and third Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m.

Written by Matthew Kaiser, Fairfax County Park Authority deputy public information officer, and Debbie Billodeaux, volunteer and park neighbor.

My Favorite Drive

Percheron draft horses

Jesse and Michael, Frying Pan Farm Park’ s Percheron draft horses

Have you ever dreaded a day because you fear change? You have something great, but it has to leave, and you are not sure if you will like the replacement. A year in school, a new teacher, a boyfriend or girlfriend. How often was your fear replaced with gratification, and you even had trouble remembering why you were worried?

That happened at Frying Pan Farm Park with the arrival of the Jackson boys.

Years ago, when I began working at Frying Pan, there were eight Belgian Draft horses walking those fields. Kidwell Farm housed two aged mares named Kit and Kay. All the other horses were their offspring. There was a huge, light blonde gelding named Dusty, his younger brother Sam, and a cousin named Pete. Their color favored toward sorrel with white manes and tails. They had two younger sisters, Sara and Leigh. Kay was nursing a young gelding named Major when I arrived.

Over the next couple of years, for a number of reasons, the demonstration farm sold all the males and kept the team of mares and the team of fillies. Kit and Kay performed traditional work and powered interpretive wagon rides. They were huge draws, especially during special events. There were several attempts to train Sara and Leigh to eventually replace their mothers; however they just couldn’t be trusted in a public atmosphere under harness. Some said they were spoiled, and others said they were just too ornery. They were eventually sold to another farm, and Kidwell Farm faced a dilemma.

The farm needed a new team.

Kit and Kay were Kidwell cornerstones and beloved by thousands. They were valuable for routine farm tasks and special events; however they couldn’t perform in a routine and continual manner. They were forced into retirement and landed out west on another farm. Sarah and Leigh were still on hand, but more for show than work.

The task of finding another team that could perform so many duties with a staff of people who didn’t grow up working draft horses on a regular basis seemed impossible. Staff traveled through three states and looked at a dozen teams of multiple breeds — Belgians, Clydesdales, Suffolks, and crosses.

Some could pull hayrides well but couldn’t do field work. Some were great except in public. Some teams had one horse that was calm, well trained and could do everything, but its partner wasn’t as good. I remember traveling through the hills of West Virginia and viewing the most beautiful team you ever saw, but they scared me to death, and that was on their own farm. We saw one team with a lame horse. The farmer told us that would get better. We didn’t think so.

My biggest concern was finding a team that would not get spooked. I wanted them bombproof, a term used in the equestrian world to represent an extremely calm horse that can handle any surprise.

I got a call from someone in the Virginia Draft Horse Association who told me there was a team in Manassas we should see. Honestly, I thought Manassas? How would a decent team of horses be in the urbanization of Manassas? They were geldings, about 15 years old, and Percherons. I’d never worked with Percherons, and we wanted to stick with Belgians because the park had had success with them. However, I didn’t want to seem unappreciative, so I said we’d go take a look.

A few of us travelled to Catharpin, near the battlefield in Manassas, and arrived at a small farmette with some paddocks, a barn, sheds and a nice house. We saw some ponies and a few riding horses. As we met with the farmer, he showed us two large, solid black draft horses with little stars of white hair in the middle of their faces. Jesse and Michael. The farmer told us that you could only tell them apart by the gray hair around Jesse’s nose. They looked very healthy and in great shape. They were comfortable with us walking around for close inspections and petting them. I picked up hooves, and the horses cooperated. The farmer told me they were named after Jesse Jackson and Michael Jackson. Jesse was more muscular and a little heavier than Michael. Michael was taller, better balanced and better looking.

The farmer hitched them up and began answering our questions. Jesse and Michael came out of the hills of Tennessee, had done some logging and farm work, could plow, rake, hay, disk fields, and had occasionally pulled hayride wagons. If they had a problem, it was that they were almost always trained better than their drivers. My ears perked when the farmer said he took them to the annual Christmas parade in downtown Manassas – a public experience.

The horses didn’t move as he harnessed them up and connected them together. As he drove them out behind the barn, the farmer said he loved them but needed to sell them because he was losing some acreage that he used for grazing. He hitched them up to a wagon that he used for the parades and drove us out to a field, telling us stories about Jesse and Michael. We came to an open gate and a few feet of dirt road, then nothing. You couldn’t see anything. The road disappeared. As we neared the entrance, I saw the road dropped sharply about 100 feet. It was an old dirt path crossed with windy ditches of obvious erosion. My fellow Frying Pan staffers looked at each other. Nobody spoke. We were thinking, “What is this nut going to do with us?”

The farmer talked on. Jesse and Michael started down the hill. We held on. Then, something amazing.

A team of horses is the “stop and go” of a wagon ride. They’re the engine. The team works side by side and even with each other. But this was beyond just working side by side.
As they began to go down the hill, Jesse and Michael swung their butts out and away from each other, stretching the harnesses out as far as they could. They turned their backsides out so far they were looking at each other. Then they sidestepped all the way down the hill, controlling the wagon speed. Our eyes were bigger than the ones on the horses. The farmer said he didn’t train them to do it, it was just their instinct.

I started thinking that I bet they’re not as good in public situations as promised. As we came to the end of the field, the farmer said we’d go back to the barn. Again, we looked at each other and wondered about climbing the huge hill we’d just descended. Instead, the farmer pulled up to busy Route 234 where cars were crossing the horses’ faces at about 60 miles per hour. The horses just stood there. Then a slap of lines on their backs, and the team pulled out onto 234 in a gap between cars. Our mouths looked ready to catch bugs. The horses started trotting and remained under great control. Cars flew by, cars turned, cars passed us. Jesse and Michael could not have cared less.

I was sold.

Michael and Jesse arrived at Frying Pan shortly after Sara and Leigh departed. The public instantly loved them, and the horses became famous. We worked together like I had driven them for a long time. Michael loved to start off fast. I would hold him back for about 10 minutes until he calmed. Other times I would let him trot to burn that energy off a little, although that may not have pleased his partner. Jesse was calmer and conserved his energy. About a half hour into their work, Michael would drop back and Jesse would wind up pulling most of the load. I often wondered if they spoke about that back in the stall. I learned a lot about teamwork from watching those guys.

Draft horses Jesse and Michael after a December 2009 blizzard.

Draft horses Jesse and Michael after a December 2009 blizzard.

Years went by, so did wagon rides, demonstrations in the crop fields and thousands of hands rubbing the long faces of these gentle giants. As they aged, the team went into a semi-retirement. They would get hitched up for special occasions and events, and each December they’d pull Santa around with anxious kids and their parents. One year, Jesse decided he was done providing that service, and he made that decision in the middle of a ride. I could not persuade him to finish. I disembarked the wagon and led the team back to the barn. They never pulled Santa again.

The last public time Jesse and Michael were hitched was in 2010 to haul some dignitaries around the site as Fairfax County Park Authority celebrated its 60th anniversary. The boys didn’t pull a wagon again. They went into retirement and were often the first things people saw as they arrived at the park. They remained some of the very few animals referred to by name rather than species. I am sure there are more pictures of Jesse and Michael than of any other feature at Frying Pan Farm Park.

I visited Jesse and Michael in the late summer of 2013. Surpassing 35 years of age, Jesse resembled an old man with muscle tone absent and simply not looking as tall and powerful as before. Michael still looked in great shape with his body confirmation still intact. His eyes weren’t as clear as they once were, his face had some grey, and veterinarians had told us there were internal concerns.

As when anyone or anything gets older and is no longer with us, we feel sad. I was, that day. But I found myself remembering all that these guys had done for thousands of people over the decades. They were an era of Frying Pan Farm Park, a huge part and attraction to the site during a burst of park visitation and growth.

In my 22-year park career, including days at Frying Pan and now at agency headquarters, I have had hundreds of great days. But the best days are by far the ones spent behind the butts of those gentle giants. Taking Jesse and Michael out to the field to work or driving them on the road for a wagon ride for the public, I felt like the type of farmer my dad and his dad were. Those days allowed me, for a while, to make my life journey parallel that of my father, grandfather and my heroes. So I thank Michael and Jesse for that and for so much on behalf of thousands who forged their own experiences because of the team. I am proud to say that I was the first person to drive those horses at Frying Pan Farm Park and the last one to have them in harness there. Drive on guys, you will be missed.

Shortly after author Todd Brown wrote this remembrance, Michael died on September 12, 2013, at age 34. Brown is the Operations Branch Manager in the Fairfax County Park Authority’s Resource Management Division and a former site manager of Frying Pan Farm Park.

Frying Pan Says Good-Bye To Popular Horse

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The Friends of Frying Pan Farm Park and the Fairfax County Park Authority are saddened by the passing of Michael, one of the park’s Percheron draft horses. Michael was 34 years old and died on September 12, 2013. Michael was born in Tennessee and moved to Virginia in the 1990s. Michael and his teammate Jesse came to Frying Pan Farm Park in 1999. Since their arrival, they provided wagon rides and farm demonstrations. Michael was an integral part of our educational programs and both were popular additions at special events. Michael and Jesse were often the first and last stop for many of our regular visitors, and some of the few farm animals that were known by name.

Michael was considered by the staff members as a very powerful, athletic, attractive horse with high-quality confirmation. He was extremely well-trained and could perform a variety of farm and park tasks whenever asked. He will be greatly missed.

The staff, the people who take care of the animals on a daily basis, our volunteers, and park management share the public’s concern over Jesse’s well-being during this period of adjustment. The staff will be working with the park’s Friends group, veterinarians and equestrian experts to assist Jesse in this transition as needed.

Margaret C. Peck: Thank You For 40 Years Of Dedicated Service

Former Sully Historic Site Manager and Sully Foundation Board member Margaret Peck cuts the cake at her retirement party. Behind her from left to right are Hal Strickland, Sully District representative, Park Authority Board; Park Authority Director John Dargle, Jr.; Sully District Supervisor Michael Frey; and Sully Historic Site Manager Carol McDonnell.

With some sadness and tremendous respect to her long standing achievements, we wished Margaret C. Peck well with a special “Sully House” cake at the May gathering of the Sully Foundation, when she retired from the Sully Foundation Board. She gave 40 years of service to the Park Authority, the Sully Foundation, Ltd. and the community.   She served 18 years with FCPA (including the manager position at Sully from 1976 – 1988) and 22 as a board member of the Sully Foundation, Ltd. and was their Treasurer for 10 years.

She also has been an active local historian, educator, author and contributor to several books including Images of America Series: Washington Dulles International Airport, Virginia and Around Herndon. She was a contributing author and editor for Voices of Chantilly, Recollections and Stories from 22 long-time residents, Stories of Floris, Sully: 1794– Stories and Letters, and Samplings from Sully’s Hearth, the cookbook.

I interviewed Margaret at her lovely home in Herndon, preparing for the Park Authority to give her a special achievement resolution. She is most proud of the preservation of Sully, she worked personally with Eddie Wagstaff, who was Sully’s first curator and was also partially responsible for the fight to save Sully from becoming part of the buffer area for Dulles Airport. As manager at Sully she helped to develop a successful school-aged museum education program – including the four learning centers we offer today.  She especially enjoyed developing the kitchen program.  She liked to “take words and put them into action,” through demonstrations of real cooking representing the late 18th century. 

She researched historic letters and documents for years, documenting stories for the families that lived at Sully; especially the Richard Bland Lee family. Margaret helped to develop the docent manual and trained many people on tours and interpretation – giving them confidence to give in-depth tours and sharing the human aspect of the specific history at Sully.

Through the years, Margaret appreciated working with exceptional staff to produce all types of programs including Christmas tours and many fall and spring festivals.  She remembers working with Mr. Bush, an older gentleman from Herndon who gave horse and wagon rides on the Sully grounds for 25 cents a ride!  She actively worked with the Society of the Lees of Virginia in their support of Sully projects and lending of various collection pieces.  She was an advocate, along with her dedicated husband Ben, for the preservation of Frying Pan Farm Park school house and meeting house, working on the master plan with the Frying Pan Farm Park staff and many other projects there.

There are many memories that she shared- she was thrilled watching the first Concord jet arrive at Dulles, viewing it from Sully along with the public and staff.  Her favorite memory, which is a keeper,- was one year when she worked at Sully on Thanksgiving Day, when Sully was open year round except for Christmas.  It started to snow and across the field came Bland Lee V, (Great, great grandson of Richard Bland Lee) his wife and daughter.  They had come in to see her and take a tour amidst the beautiful snow on that special holiday.

Of course Margaret will still be around, visiting Sully with friends and relatives.  She will also continue to lend us Ben’s WWII uniform for our summer WWII living history weekend! We will see her soon!

Written by Carol McDonnell, manager, Sully Historic Site